image_1433166495_556c629f6c872[1]Media Studies is taught at Loxford School across KS4 and KS5.

Whilst Media Studies is not taught as a specialist subject at KS3, many students still have opportunities to learn about the media and create their own Media products, usually within their English classroom.

All the teachers in the department are specialist teachers, who have a broad theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject, plus they are really passionate about Media Studies as a subject. As we are now in an age of media and digital technology, a subject like Media Studies is only going to become even more relevant and important. Any enquires about the subject should be directed to Mr Rushworth at the school.

Outside of the classroom

What can you do to improve your grades in Media Studies outside of the classroom?

Media Studies is all about keeping up to date with trends and how things work in the modern age. Trends change very quickly and young people are in a unique position to see how these changes occur. Watching the latest films, listening to music, surfing the net, creating and updating an online blog, reading magazines and newspapers and using new forms of communication will all help you get better at your subject. As long as you are doing these things critically and thinking about HOW and WHY things work the way they do. It is important to watch out for the changes and to read any literature you can find on the subject.

Developing a wider understanding of the outside world is key to being able to formulate the informed opinions that will help your chances of making great progress in this subject.  Some of the activities you could undertake are regularly logging onto the Guardian Media website to see what issues within the media industry are being discussed.  Why not follow media commentators such as media blog, or Ofcom on Twitter to keep abreast of the latest debates.

London is a great city which allows you access to institutions such as The British Film Institute on the South Bank who are always having great film related events. There are also film premieres happening in London on a weekly basis.  You live in a “Media rich” city, so why not get out and explore it.

The London Film Festival every year gives you access not only to mainstream cinema but films from independent producers that you would not be able to access in your local multiplex cinema.

Read magazines such as Sight and Sound or Screenonline to give you more thorough insight into film and TV related topics.

Watch foreign films with subtitles, read a film or music magazine and get out and explore all of what London has to offer.  All of these out of school activities will further enrich your both your academic and cultural experiences.

Support for your Learning

Media Studies is a subject that firmly concentrates on students learning the key concepts behind all media. Some of these include: representation; audience; institution; genre and learning to use media language when analysing or creating media products. Media Studies is a highly theoretical subject and it helps teach students the skills to critically analyse and interpret texts. Students undertake a range of activities within the classroom, during educational visits and in creating their own media products. Students undertake this range of tasks individually and within small groups.

Media Studies is the only subject where a student can say: “But Mum… I have to watch this show… it’s homework!”

Media Studies is all about keeping up to date with trends and how things work in the modern age. Trends change very quickly and young people are in a unique position to see how these changes occur. Watching the latest films, listening to music, surfing the net, reading magazines and newspapers and using new forms of communication will all help you get better at your subject. As long as you are doing these things critically and thinking about HOW and WHY things work the way they do. It is important to watch out for the changes and to read any literature you can find on the subject. Of course, you must always do the readings given to you by your teacher as well!

Another valuable aspect of the subject is looking to the past for information – watch old films and TV shows, talk to your older relatives about how things have changed over time.

You can also spend your spare time making your own media products – get out with a camcorder or even your phone and do some filming. Record the music that your friends make and try and market it. Utilising sites like Facebook and MySpace are a good way to get your name out there and well known.

Useful links for all students:
www.mediaknowall.com – an excellent general overview of all topics covered in GCSE and A-level Media
www.bbc.co.uk/dna/filmnetwork – an online resource of over 500 UK short films
www.wikipedia.org – an online Encyclopedia with thousands of articles on all subjects
www.imdb.com – an online movie database with information about most of the films ever made
www.launchingfilms.com – everything you need to know and understand about film distribution in the UK
www.bfi.org.uk – the must see site for the British Film Institute!
www.moviepreviewguide.com – a great site which lists all upcoming films in the UK.
www.bafta.org – the homepage for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.
www.guardian.co.uk/media – an excellent site for all things “Media”